GETTING READY FOR YOUR PUPPY!

The following will be provided to you with your puppy from Lawpdoodle K9 Manor:

1. Health Records including shots and de-worming

2. General puppy raising information

3. Contract of Sale

4. A couple of toys

5. British Style Slip Lead (since many of our customers like to get their own style of collar, leash or harness, we’ve decided to no longer supply the generic, basic quality collars and leashes, but instead provide the higher quality Mendota British Style Slip Lead).

7. Cloth with siblings' scent

8. Sample of food 

First and foremost, be sure to make your Vet Appointment within 3 - 4 days following the day your puppy goes home.  THEN.....visit a Pet Store!  I love shopping for my pets, and I love getting those calls and emails that say they are getting ready to go shopping at the Pet Store!  My favorite "mall"!  Things to look for while you are there:

 1)  Toys, toys, toys!   Puppies love toys!  Squeaky toys, chewy toys, fuzzy toys.  However, please use some discretion when picking out new toys for your puppy.   Puppies like to chew, chew, chew If the toys are "cheap" and easily destroyed, a puppy can ingest parts of the toys which can be dangerous. Rawhide is okay in moderation.  We like Nylabones and Kongs.  Look for chew toys that will massage their gums and teeth.  Balls that roll and you can throw...anything that moves that they can chase!

 2)  We recommend a stuffed animal for the first few nights to help with the separation anxiety. A fleecy cloth that will be provided with your puppy's welcome home kit. If you spend a good bit of time cuddling your puppy in the first few hours, place a piece of recently worn clothing (shirt) in with your puppy when crating the first couple of nights. If you do not purchase a "pet friendly" stuffed animal at a pet store, just be sure not to purchase anything with "removable parts", such as plastic eyes.  These can be easily chewed off and swallowed by your puppy, and can also be dangerous.

 3) Food. Please visit this website for current ratings on dog food in the market today. www.dogfoodadvisor.com/recent-updates/ We start all of our puppies on Victor Hero Canine.  I order mine for convenience from www.chewy.com. 

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This is NOT a brand of dog food that can be found at your local grocery store or supermarket. I've always had the philosophy that if it can be found in one of these two locations....it's probably NOT good for your dog. A good pet feed store or large pet store chain will carry the better quality foods. Avoid grains, such as corn, wheat and soy, which are the biggest culprits to common skin allergies, stomach issues and chronic ear infections. Since we only breed large breed dogs, keeping them on a large breed formula is extremely important for proper development of bones and muscles and helping to maintain good bone and muscle health throughout their adulthood as well.  We do recommend, however, that you consider researching some of these foods as their systems develop and becomes more tolerant to changes. You will receive a sample of the Victor Hero Canine when you take your puppy home.  

We are free-feeders, and you will receive different opinions about ways to feed from fellow dog owners, breeders, trainers and vets. When asked about our feeding policies, we can only share what we know works for us and why.  We have a multi-dog household, 1 bowl of food, 1 bowl of water.  They learn to share and not be food-hogs, and they “graze” throughout the day….they do NOT inhale their food.  With the security of knowing their food is always available, they learn to graze and will only eat what they need. Our dogs are not obese.  Obesity is less about food and more about lack of exercise. If we were to determine mealtime and amounts of food, which is only necessary when there is a health issue, they will become hungry and anticipate that next meal.  When you place it in front of them, they will tend to gorge the food, sometimes with little chewing. They will also inhale more air with this type of eating.  This behavior can increase the chances of bloat, a deadly condition that many large breed dogs are prone to.  I can honestly say, we have NEVER lost a dog to bloat.

 4) Crate.  We only breed medium/large breed dogs.   We like the "Large" size wire crates that can be purchased at most pet stores (42”).  We recommend draping a blanket over the back half of the crate to give them added security and that "den-like" feel. Most do come with a divider, but we do not recommend using them.  By instinct, your puppy does not want to soil its crate.  However, when very young, they need to go quite frequently.  If for some reason, you are unable to get to your puppy soon enough, he/she may soil its crate out of necessity.  If the puppy is in a small area, it will soil where they sleep, as they have no choice.   Therein, your puppy may become desenstized to its natural instinct of of not soiling its bedding.

If your puppy has a larger area, he/she may go in a small area in a corner, maintaining that instinct.  As they grow into their crate and develop more control, they will not soil their crate at all.  By this time, through proper training and patience, you should be through the most challenging days of housebreaking. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER use the crate for punishment or “Time Out”. Their crate is to be their sanctuary, their safe place and a positive place. This is essential if you plan to leave them alone in your home for a period of time in the crate. They can otherwise harm themselves if severe separation anxiety ensues. Also, NEVER leave their collars on while in their crates. Although we have not personally experienced this or heard of it from our families, it is a fact that puppies have been known to hang themselves, sadly.

If you are traveling by car for several hours, we recommend a smaller traveling crate if traveling alone, unless you have the room for the large wire crate in a van or SUV. A lap will do if more than one person is traveling, as the security of being close will help the puppy not get car sick and feel more comfortable.  The necessities for traveling are as follows:

a) Traveling crate

b) A couple of towels for bedding and/or lap

c) Wipes

d) Paper Towels

e) Trash Bags

f) Water bowl and bottle(s) of water

g) Patience

 6) Remember...any accident that happens in your house is YOUR FAULT...not the puppy's.  Please do not punish your puppy.  It is up to you to be diligent from the time your puppy arrives home.  When little, they need to go more often.  Stay tuned in, and get to know your puppy's "needs".  This means you might need to get up once or twice a night the first few days.   Keep consistent.  Always take your puppy outside!  Do not buy those puppy pads or paper train...it just delays what your ultimate goal will be and confuses the puppy....TAKE YOUR PUPPY OUTSIDE...regardless of the weather.   If there is a lot of snow...shovel a "spot" for your puppy.  Take your puppy out the same door you want them to go out when they learn to tell you they need to go potty.   Say the same thing over and over again, "Go Potty".  When they relieve themselves...praise them, praise them!  They want you to be happy...when they know you are...they will do what they know they did to make you happy...AGAIN!  Take them out right after they wake up, right after they eat, and after a short while of playtime.   If your puppy starts to sniff and circle the floor...take them outside immediately.

 Many have found a bell on the door where they go outside helps to "communicate" their need.  This is a good training tool, and can even be purchased at your local pet store.  Communication is the biggest milestone to potty training.   If they can make a noise you can hear from the next room to alert you, it will make both of you happier in the "end”.

http://www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvetted/2013/oct/why-diagnosing-giardia-in-cats-dogs-is-difficult-30990

 7) Pick up a bottle of Bitter Apple spray at the Pet Store.   This is harmless to most clothing, furniture, pets and people.  Yet, it deters chewing of things...well...you don't want chewed (like furniture, fingers or ankles).  Remember, your puppy is teething...and their teeth can be destructive and hurt.  Boredom can also promote chewing.  Be sure you are not leaving your puppy/dog for hours alone with nothing to do.  This can turn even the best behaved dog into a terror.   When I hear of dogs that "destroy" homes, likely...it is a dog often left alone in a crate or confined area for hours each day with little to no attention by its people on a regular basis.  They need stimulation and "busy time".  Doggy Day care is a good option for some, or going home at lunch if possible.  When you are home, be sure to spend "quality" time with your puppy, and include them in everything you do whenever possible.   They are not "just dogs", they are an extension of your family. Treat them as you would treat any member of your family.

8) Don’t forget to look into pet insurance as soon as possible! There are reputable companies out there today that have saved pet owners thousands in the event of an emergency. 

https://www.healthypawspetinsurance.com/pethealth/fido/

http://www.consumersadvocate.org/pet-insurance/best-pet-insurance

We will continue to add tips and ideas to this page as they come up.  Again, please be sure to email me with any additional questions you might have in getting ready for your new family member.   We are looking forward to working with you through the life of your puppy!  Again, thank you so much for considering one of our babies to bring into your family.

 

Thank you and God Bless!

b© Lawpdoodle K9 Manor 2014